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The 1-2 Rhythm: Two Handed Backhand

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  • The 1-2 Rhythm: Two Handed Backhand

    Let's get your thoughts on Nick Wheatley's article "The 1-2 Rhythm: Two Handed Backhand"!

  • #2
    Great article...impressed.

    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    Let's get your thoughts on Nick Wheatley's article "The 1-2 Rhythm: Two Handed Backhand"!
    Well I have to say this is an excellent article. I am a big advocate of much of this kind of teaching in my own work.

    Personally I love the "set and hold" method that we see in many of Djokovic's backhands. Some of Djokovic's biggest backhands are where he utilises a holding position near the end of the backswing phase...then unleashes; other times his swing is more continuous. Like Nick I see many juniors with a holding position way too early, sometimes holding near to the very start of the backswing. I feel it's critical to address this type of thing as soon as we spot it. It's a basic.

    More and more we seem to be seeing tour players using the C-shape backhands where the racket is lifted just slightly upwards and around in a C-shape at the end of the "ease up" or "holding" position. I think this type of backhand works really well on the slower courts prevalent on the tour today. I try to advocate this as much as possible to my two-handed students, although it is not suited to everyone. I am not sure it would have worked so well on the fast grass of old where players were more apt to draw the racket straight back...route one method. It's amazing how courts dictate technique and stroke production. Change the playing conditions and you get players with different looking strokes, that simple.

    I found Nick's article really great....made me quite proud to be British.
    Last edited by stotty; 12-05-2015, 09:13 AM.
    Stotty

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    • #3
      Another great article by Nick.
      I have used the 1-2 rhythm technique on the forehand expressed in last month's thread on his article. Admittedly, I have never used it on the backhand. Until now. Great article.

      Question, is there an ideal range or distance how close the hands need to be on the two-hander during the unit turn and backswing. I'm looking for a visual cue that may make it easier for my students. I see many people struggle with this. Yes the unit turn looks good and the racquet tip may be up but I've seen the hands go from physically touching the belly button to far out like reaching for a life raft. There is certainly a happy medium, but what is it?

      Thanks,

      Kyle LaCroix USPTA
      Boca Raton

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by licensedcoach View Post
        Well I have to say this is an excellent article. I am a big advocate of much of this kind of teaching in my own work.

        Personally I love the "set and hold" method that we see in many of Djokovic's backhands. Some of Djokovic's biggest backhands are where he utilises a holding position near the end of the backswing phase...then unleashes; other times his swing is more continuous. Like Nick I see many juniors with a holding position way too early, sometimes holding near to the very start of the backswing. I feel it's critical to address this type of thing as soon as we spot it. It's a basic.

        More and more we seem to be seeing tour players using the C-shape backhands where the racket is lifted just slightly upwards and around in a C-shape at the end of the "ease up" or "holding" position. I think this type of backhand works really well on the slower courts prevalent on the tour today. I try to advocate this as much as possible to my two-handed students, although it is not suited to everyone. I am not sure it would have worked so well on the fast grass of old where players were more apt to draw the racket straight back...route one method. It's amazing how courts dictate technique and stroke production. Change the playing conditions and you get players with different looking strokes, that simple.

        I found Nick's article really great....made me quite proud to be British.
        Thanks for the positive comments Stotty, and it's great if I can add to the British influence on here

        It amazes me to see the backhands of many good junior players, who come and play tournaments at our club from the big academies and performance centre's. They often have these stutters that disrupt the flow and rhythm, and usually some version of the 1-2-3 examples I mentioned in the article. I don't know why it isn't addressed, and agree 100% that it should be addressed at the first opportunity.

        For me, the simpler and smoother that unit turn and backswing can be, the better.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by klacr View Post
          Another great article by Nick.
          I have used the 1-2 rhythm technique on the forehand expressed in last month's thread on his article. Admittedly, I have never used it on the backhand. Until now. Great article.

          Question, is there an ideal range or distance how close the hands need to be on the two-hander during the unit turn and backswing. I'm looking for a visual cue that may make it easier for my students. I see many people struggle with this. Yes the unit turn looks good and the racquet tip may be up but I've seen the hands go from physically touching the belly button to far out like reaching for a life raft. There is certainly a happy medium, but what is it?

          Thanks,

          Kyle LaCroix USPTA
          Boca Raton
          Thanks Kyle, and a really good question that hopefully we'll get a few opinions on. I certainly couldn't offer a definitive answer to where exactly that happy medium is, but certainly have some views.

          I often try and encourage players to push their elbows forwards a little for their ready position, and get a bit of distance between the hands and torso so they aren't too cramped. From there (and quite like Djokovic), they can pretty much let the entire arm/racket structure come along for the ride during the unit turn and even into the backswing. Simple and smooth for best results.

          I think being too cramped is worse than being too stretched out, often the arms do stretch out a little at the end of the backswing, and I would always favour a bit more distance as long as the elbows don't straighten completely during that unit turn and first part of the backswing.

          Is there a biomechanically perfect distance, or is this something that should vary based on the player's style?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by nickw View Post

            Is there a biomechanically perfect distance, or is this something that should vary based on the player's style?
            Thanks for response Nick.

            And yes. That is the heart of my question.

            Kyle LaCroix USPTA
            Boca Raton

            Comment


            • #7
              Well, I guess there aren't many firm views out there! If someone had to push me off the fence and side with one, my instinct would say there probably is a biomechanically perfect distance.

              The other question that should be asked though, is how much benefit would there be in finding it and using it, compared to being somewhere close to it?

              Maybe not enough in the eyes of most coaches to delve deeper and come up with a firm answer. 'Don't be too cramped up, keep some nice distance between you and the ball' seems the most popular advice on both groundstrokes.

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