header
  • You have been logged out of the forums. Please logout of our main site then login again on our home page. You will be automatically logged into the forums again.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Bryan Brothers: Principles of Winning Doubles

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Bryan Brothers: Principles of Winning Doubles

    Let's discuss of Mark Hodgkinson's article, "The Bryan Brothers: Principles of Winning Doubles"!

  • #2
    Hard to argue when the example set forth are the Bryan Brothers. Superb team in all categories. Good article. Hoping we get the Previdi father/son duo to weigh in on this as I'd love to hear this translation into the club and ladies doubles. I have my thoughts. But yeah, those Bryan Brothers are awesome to see live. Will see them in a few weeks at the Delray Beach tour stop.

    Kyle LaCroix USPTA
    Boca Raton

    Comment


    • #3
      That's the question right?? What applies???

      Comment


      • #4
        And not just what applies? How do we apply and implement into a club player's game. Pro tour doubles is a different animal entirely. I actually get more impressed by the atp tour doubles than I do the singles. Some really incredible athletes, skills, talents. A different dynamic that is not seen at club level.

        I do have a win over Becker in doubles. Of course, That's Sally Becker and she plays on my level 2 team, but hey, a win is a win is a win. She couldn't handle the serve & volley

        Kyle LaCroix USPTA
        Boca Raton

        Comment


        • #5
          More Poaches in Lowlife Doubles

          Poor Sally. She must have thought she was in Jurassic Park. A good starting place is furniture three in this article. "The key to poaching is to get over the middle." Oh, those words are the caption under another furniture. Too bad. They still apply. Get over the middle. But how?

          In furniture three, poacher is pretty far back to start, within two feet of the service line. He is shaded toward center. His split step is in place.

          What is the sequence? A split step and a skip and volley with left foot coming down toward the net.

          Analyze-- live dangerously. Analyze the skip: the LEFT foot comes down first. The right foot comes down marginally second. Contrast this sequence with the neutrality of the double-pronged split step. How far does left foot move? Six to eight inches. How far does right foot move? Six to eight inches. That adds up to 16 inches beyond what your stupidest self wants to provide.

          Move right foot first and you're dead for the poach although you might hit an open volley that way. Reverse all thinking for a poach across middle from the deuce court.
          Last edited by bottle; 01-06-2016, 05:56 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            serve percentage sgls vs dbls

            Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
            Let's discuss of Mark Hodgkinson's article, "The Bryan Brothers: Principles of Winning Doubles"!
            Saw this quote in the article; "In singles you can serve 50 per cent and be fine, but in doubles you need to serve high 70s." But for the life of me I can't figure out why?!

            Comment


            • #7
              Don't bother to figure it out. Just play lots of doubles and you will see it's true.

              Okay, sorry, you want more. Think of all the pressure that spotty service performance puts on second serves, which good opponents love to beat up on.

              Think of how most doubles points are established by who seizes the initiative first whereas in singles there are longer rallies with greater odds therefore of turning the tables.

              Just one explanation. I'm sure there are others, e.g., good first serves set up the guy at net whereas in singles somebody can just dump the serve back since there is greater area of open court to work with.

              The stupidest thing in doubles is when somebody tries for huge serves over and over and therefore doesn't get many in. Followed by a pitty-pat that gets clobbered. The server would be so much better with a well placed three-quarter or half-speed number but with good swerve and/or hop. Some experts even say to use your second serve twice. I don't buy it except in the case of the dummy I just described. If you're getting a huge first serve in all the time that's different. Unless it's not as huge as you think. And the opponents are turning the non-intimidating speed of it back on you to torture you.
              Last edited by bottle; 01-06-2016, 09:29 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by terryb3 View Post
                Saw this quote in the article; "In singles you can serve 50 per cent and be fine, but in doubles you need to serve high 70s." But for the life of me I can't figure out why?!
                In singles serving with lots of risk aka low 1st serve% wins many free points. Then if the 1st serve is missed a reliable/weaker serve gets the point started which you can win by grinding and playing smart defence.

                However, in doubles there is less grinding because players start the point in attacking position. So, there is more benefit to serve to set up your partner with your 1st serve and pressure your opponents by making them hit lots of good returns. If you chose to hit a risky free points serve your team will still get those free points. But, then if you hit that relialbe/weaker serve the returning team gets the opportunity to take advantage of their aggressively placed player and puts pressure on the serving team.
                Last edited by lobndropshot; 01-06-2016, 09:58 AM. Reason: My lying eyes

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just got Mark's book, "Game, Set and Match". Entertaining read. Some unique and thoughtful advice from the game's top players, coaches and experts. Covering all aspects. Good stuff.

                  Kyle LaCroix USPTA
                  Boca Raton

                  Comment

                  Who's Online

                  Collapse

                  There are currently 175 users online. 10 members and 165 guests.

                  Most users ever online was 382 at 09:55 AM on 11-05-2018.

                  Working...
                  X