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Anticipating the Serve

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  • johnyandell
    started a topic Anticipating the Serve

    Anticipating the Serve

    Let's discuss, "Anticipating the Serve", by Machar Reed, Miguel Crespo, and Damian Farrow!

  • tennisscience
    replied
    This is Machar and here are some of the great questions and my responses from our first article:

    The positions on return of serve, are they taken from the position players take up to receive serve or their position on contact with ball? In other words, are you taking into account Murray's massive lunge step?
    The positions are taken from the point at which players contact the ball, so yes, Murray’s lunge step is considered.

    As tour players only get a blink of time to return, are you aware of research in other areas? The timing and height of a player's split step? How about sheer reflexes, does Djokovic get a millisecond head start on other players?
    Exploration of the spatial and temporal relationships between the split step and other facets of the game are relatively under-developed. In the near future, our GIG (Game Insight Group) team, we will be running with a story about the quickest set of “hands-eyes” on return. Unsurprisingly, in the men’s game, the likes of Federer and Benneteau feature prominently.

    Of the Big 4 who has been aced the most over say a 1000 return games. I imagine Djokovic and Murray are the most difficult to ace. But I wonder if there are any stats on that? And does Nadal pay the price on that one with his retreated position?
    I don’t have that answer immediately at hand (but will have a sniff around!) My sense would be the same as the reader’s though.

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  • stotty
    replied
    Questions for Machar:

    These positions on return of serve, are they taken from the position players take up to receive serve or their position on contact with ball? In other words, are you taking into account Murray's massive lunge step?

    As tour players only get a blink of time to return, have you researched other areas? The timing and height of a player's split step must play a big part? How about sheer reflexes, does Djokovic get a millisecond head start on other players? High speed video might reveal this?

    I wonder of the Big 4 who has been aced the most over say a 1000 return games. I imagine Djokovic and Murray are the most difficult to ace. But I wonder if there are any stats on that? And does Nadal pay the price on that one with his retreated position?

    Stotty

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Another point--this article is not evaluating the relative amount of forward hand and arm rotation. That's way more important that these backswing differences which are impossible to implement for the average player anyway. Still he probably has made a good distinction--just not as magical as he thinks. He is a sincere passionate guy.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickw
    replied
    Thanks John! Just asking questions makes you think and helps you learn, so answers are a bonus! Thoughts and opinions, with no definitive answer, also valuable.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Great questions! Machar says he will answer some questions after the first--doubt anyone has the answers to the great ones you are asking though!

    Leave a comment:


  • nickw
    replied
    I read this book already, some very interesting stuff in it, but this section on returning serve was disappointing. Not enough detail, what exactly are the players looking for in the path of the racket, and how exactly are they reacting to it before their opponent strikes the serve? I have never ever heard a pro player talk about racket cues helping them to predict serve location, has anyone else? Does Ferrer do it better than others? He stands in very close and has great returning stats, or is it his exceptionally timed split step, excellent ball tracking skills, compact backswing, early contact etc? How do racket cues relate to Nadal's very deep return position, which gives him time to use his bigger swings?

    Leave a comment:


  • bottle
    replied
    Originally posted by don_budge View Post
    "The game of tennis has changed drastically over the decades, as developments in technology and conditioning regimens, among other factors, have altered the style of play. Underpinning many of these developments is science, and this book explains the scientific wonders that take the ball from racquet to racquet and back again."

    Complete and utter nonsense! Rediscovery of the wheel The cult of science prowling about. I looked at only one thing seriously in this article. I looked at where Roger Federer was receiving. I haphazardly glanced at where Nadal was standing picking his butt.
    "The cult of science?" (https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...TF-8#q=Luddite)

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    So Machar Reid is going to respond to a few questions starting Jan 3. Post them now if you can and try to keep them "concise"...

    Leave a comment:


  • doctorhl
    replied
    Thanks-will do.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    doc,
    Look in the HS Stroke Archives! Especially Murray.

    Leave a comment:


  • doctorhl
    replied
    I am interested in the returner foot action and timing when a player occasionally moves forward during the Serving windup/toss to close in and reset their position to avoid high contact.Some players seem to cover a great distance and know when to initiate the movement much better than others. Do you have footage?

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Stotty,
    I can only ask not compel.

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    "The game of tennis has changed drastically over the decades, as developments in technology and conditioning regimens, among other factors, have altered the style of play. Underpinning many of these developments is science, and this book explains the scientific wonders that take the ball from racquet to racquet and back again."

    Complete and utter nonsense! Rediscovery of the wheel The cult of science prowling about. I looked at only one thing seriously in this article. I looked at where Roger Federer was receiving. I haphazardly glanced at where Nadal was standing picking his butt.

    Leave a comment:


  • tennisscience
    replied
    bd,
    That was from the Australian only

    Leave a comment:

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