Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ultimate Fundamentals: Forehand Volley

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ultimate Fundamentals: Forehand Volley

    Would love to discuss my latest article, "Ultimate Fundamentals: Forehand Volley"

  • #2
    Excellent and concise breakdown of forehand volley. Learning this compact move gives one a little more time to anticipate the direction of the opponent's shot. The compact move should give one the confidence to understand that there will be time for a slight grip change for those using a continental grip when waiting. The movement also makes it much easier to learn the drop volley with those preparation mechanics in place. I am anxious for your backhand volley analysis. I try to mirror the forehand volley when hitting the backhand volley, but there must be sublte differences.

    Comment


    • #3
      Very good video on the forehand volley. I especially liked the statement that the step forward is not an integral component in powering the volley. Volleying is essentially the art of deflection. John McEnroe is a great example of a player who deflected shots at the net with supreme control and artistry. He had the ability to vary the tension in his hands to handle a myriad of shots from his opponents. Of course using Roger Federer as a model was a great choice. Roger deflects shots at the net beautifully.

      Norman Ashbrooke

      Comment


      • #5
        If you watch Fed, he seems to really drive through the fh volley. I find that with intermediate players that I teach - 4.0 to 4.5 level - when they start trying to drive the fh volley like Fed does, it adds almost too much swing to the actual volley and errors start creeping into their volley. Would you teach such a huge drive through the ball from the very beginning to students or would you add this huge drive through later once they develop proper feet and a proper contact point etc. Shorter volley swing path is easier to control for sure.

        Comment


        • #6
          We all know what a great volleyer McEnroe was (and still is), but I forgot how classic Lendl's volley form was. He would be an even better model than Johnny Mac for someone to copy volleying form. Notice how much he keeps the racket parallel to the net as he completes his volleys...and the way he prepares the racket head behind the ball for each volley. Excellent model!

          don

          Comment


          • #7
            Doctor,
            You can get a preview by looking at my backhand volley articles in the Advanced Tennis section.

            Norman,
            Check out that video Don Budge posted--great footage of Mac!

            Tweaner,
            If you look at the article it tries to isolate the core fundamentals. Not about hitting "like" Fed necessarily--but mastering the foundational elements Fed and all good volleyers share. For further info check out the two classic lessons I posted with the new issue--two previous articles I did on the forehand volleys.

            Don,
            Interesting isn't it?

            Comment


            • #8
              Now for some proper volleys.

              Watch from 0:14 to 1:36 please. Rosewall looks a slightly stronger continental and holds the racket higher up the grip than modern players; Hoad the same but the angle of his clips don't reveal enough to be certain. I would say the classic volleyer allows himself a little more backswing and follow through at times. There is definitely more relaxation in Hoad and Rosewall's volleys than the modern volleyers in John's video...except for Roger, who seems equally relaxed.



              I think the grip is an interesting aspect. I have seen classic players go to a stronger continental for very low volleys, especially when stretched wide. I saw Nastase do that a number of times.
              Stotty

              Comment


              • #9
                For as long as I live and for as many times during my membership that I have seen this video, I am 100% certain I will never ever get tired of watching it. The technique is so special because of its simplicity and effectiveness.
                Bonus points for the song choice as well.

                Kyle LaCroix USPTA
                Boca Raton

                Comment


                • #10
                  It looks like all the volleys in the vid are the more powerful, drive volleys. Is that the most useful or basic volley?

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    What I did in the video is extract the key basic positions. Those are there regardless of more or less drive--which many of them are less...

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Truly excellent footage and analysis, as usual. A small point, but worth noting: at 3:16-3:42, in the section entitled, Backward Arm Rotation Variations, it is stated that "the U-shape can rotate backwards as a unit in the shoulder joint." Shortly thereafter, while showing Federer as an example [see 3:33 et seq], Yandell indicates: "this backward rotation can be a few degrees or it can continue until the racquet face is literally parallel to the court" [clearly meaning the plane of the court surface]. I believe this indication is in error, at least to the extent that it fails to recognize that the backward rotation in the volley is predominantly supination with a small amount of wrist flexion and external rotation at the shoulder joint. Looking at all the video examples for confirmation, you can see that in the U-shaped configuration, with any appreciable bend at the elbow, external rotation at the shoulder will cause the entire forearm to move backward. I suggest anyone try the experiment themselves to experience the actions.

                      Instruction does seem to shy away from certain wrist actions, particularly including supination, pronation, flexion and extension, and radial and ulnar deviation. Extension plays little to no role in most shots prior to and through contact, but the other wrist motions most definitely do. There does seem to be a little reluctance to acknowledge those actions, seeing all clockwise rotation of the hand and forearm as originating at the shoulder. I believe a careful analysis shows there to be considerable, positive, and important contributions to nearly every stroke in wrist actions, some having to do with the production of increased velocity, some with the use of muscle stretch as a source of feel for better locating the racquet, and thus enhanced positioning for impact.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by cms56 View Post
                        Truly excellent footage and analysis, as usual. A small point, but worth noting: at 3:16-3:42, in the section entitled, Backward Arm Rotation Variations, it is stated that "the U-shape can rotate backwards as a unit in the shoulder joint." Shortly thereafter, while showing Federer as an example [see 3:33 et seq], Yandell indicates: "this backward rotation can be a few degrees or it can continue until the racquet face is literally parallel to the court" [clearly meaning the plane of the court surface]. I believe this indication is in error, at least to the extent that it fails to recognize that the backward rotation in the volley is predominantly supination with a small amount of wrist flexion and external rotation at the shoulder joint. Looking at all the video examples for confirmation, you can see that in the U-shaped configuration, with any appreciable bend at the elbow, external rotation at the shoulder will cause the entire forearm to move backward. I suggest anyone try the experiment themselves to experience the actions.

                        Instruction does seem to shy away from certain wrist actions, particularly including supination, pronation, flexion and extension, and radial and ulnar deviation. Extension plays little to no role in most shots prior to and through contact, but the other wrist motions most definitely do. There does seem to be a little reluctance to acknowledge those actions, seeing all clockwise rotation of the hand and forearm as originating at the shoulder. I believe a careful analysis shows there to be considerable, positive, and important contributions to nearly every stroke in wrist actions, some having to do with the production of increased velocity, some with the use of muscle stretch as a source of feel for better locating the racquet, and thus enhanced positioning for impact.
                        Sounds great! What does it mean?

                        ..."supination, pronation, flexion and extension, and radial and ulnar deviation." Impressive you put all of these terms in the same sentence. Who are you talking to? Not to students...that's for sure.

                        It sounds super intelligent...maybe you could dumb it down a bit for us "students of the game".
                        don_budge
                        Performance Analysthttps://www.tennisplayer.net/bulleti...ilies/cool.png

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by klacr View Post
                          For as long as I live and for as many times during my membership that I have seen this video, I am 100% certain I will never ever get tired of watching it. The technique is so special because of its simplicity and effectiveness.
                          Bonus points for the song choice as well.

                          Kyle LaCroix USPTA
                          Boca Raton
                          I think the same. It is brilliant. Not one word needs to be said about this teaching aid. A work of art...deserving of high awards. The series is what you might say...a classic. It actually was filmed on the cusp of the transition from "Classic Tennis" and "Modern Tennis". 1984...I believe. There's that year again. Such a fun time to be alive. Surely George had it all wrong.

                          John McEnroe was a genius with a tennis racquet and a brilliant entertainer with impeccable sense of timing. He wore the scowling mask of drama. He used it to his advantage at every opportunity. Ivan Lendl is one of the most underrated champions ever. This giant stud on the tennis court was just tough as nails for so many years. He too had a dour reputation. But he was no nonsense on the tennis court. He wanted only one thing...to kick some booty. Both players dominated the game before and after the racquet change. Testimony to their skills and their development.

                          Yandell's presentation of both is another example of brilliant timing. These videos should be enshrined in the "Tennis Hall of Fame". That's no lie. That's no exaggeration. Tell 'em don_budge said so.
                          don_budge
                          Performance Analysthttps://www.tennisplayer.net/bulleti...ilies/cool.png

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by don_budge View Post

                            I think the same. It is brilliant. Not one word needs to be said about this teaching aid. A work of art...deserving of high awards. The series is what you might say...a classic. It actually was filmed on the cusp of the transition from "Classic Tennis" and "Modern Tennis". 1984...I believe. There's that year again. Such a fun time to be alive. Surely George had it all wrong.

                            John McEnroe was a genius with a tennis racquet and a brilliant entertainer with impeccable sense of timing. He wore the scowling mask of drama. He used it to his advantage at every opportunity. Ivan Lendl is one of the most underrated champions ever. This giant stud on the tennis court was just tough as nails for so many years. He too had a dour reputation. But he was no nonsense on the tennis court. He wanted only one thing...to kick some booty. Both players dominated the game before and after the racquet change. Testimony to their skills and their development.

                            Yandell's presentation of both is another example of brilliant timing. These videos should be enshrined in the "Tennis Hall of Fame". That's no lie. That's no exaggeration. Tell 'em don_budge said so.
                            Is this video truly a classic? The fact that we are watching it, loving it, and the same technique and principles apply makes me think that this video is timeless. Required viewing for all tennis players.

                            Kyle LaCroix USPTA
                            Boca Raton
                            Last edited by klacr; 11-11-2017, 12:58 AM.

                            Comment

                            Who's Online

                            Collapse

                            There are currently 9149 users online. 10 members and 9139 guests.

                            Most users ever online was 31,715 at 05:06 AM on 03-05-2024.

                            Working...
                            X