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A New Teaching Method: Two Handed Backhand Preparation

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  • johnyandell
    replied
    I would agree that Novak is pretty much the simplest model.

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  • nytennisaddict
    replied
    Originally posted by stotty View Post
    The thing with Zverev is he has the tip of the racket tilted forward as well as having a vertical shaft. You wonder if that gives him something more. He can hit the ball ever so hard once he starts redlining it. That said, I prefer the simplicity of Novak's, and it's so reliable.
    i prefer the djoker 2hbh better as well.... seems simpler (less things to go wrong). to me Z hits like the classic "C" loop (hands trace a "C"), whereas ND hits more of a pendulum style

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  • stotty
    replied
    The thing with Zverev is he has the tip of the racket tilted forward as well as having a vertical shaft. You wonder if that gives him something more. He can hit the ball ever so hard once he starts redlining it. That said, I prefer the simplicity of Novak's, and it's so reliable.

    Leave a comment:


  • nytennisaddict
    replied
    Originally posted by stotty View Post
    Around two-thirds of my juniors are two-handed so these upcoming articles are particularly interesting for me. I always use Novak as a model because I think he's got the cleanest and best preparation out there. I love the position/angle of his racket head as he commences the unit turn. What intrigues me is whether small differences in preparation affect affect things later down the line. For example, if a player has a vertical racket shaft, how does that effect the possibilities? Do they get any increased torque...more power? Or are there timing issues involved with having a vertical shaft that club players would find hard manage. Zverev is a really skinny guy but seems to get an awful lot of power with his method.

    Thoughts, anyone?
    IMO, the bigger the loop (eg. tip up makes the loop bigger (combined with either "U" or "C" swing) the more runway you give the racquet head tip generate rhs.
    but requires more practice reps than say a straight back (no loop) type prep to get the timing right.
    seems in general, folks with larger loops will stand back more to give them time to prep, for the benefits of a "bigger" reply.

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  • stotty
    replied
    Around two-thirds of my juniors are two-handed so these upcoming articles are particularly interesting for me. I always use Novak as a model because I think he's got the cleanest and best preparation out there. I love the position/angle of his racket head as he commences the unit turn. What intrigues me is whether small differences in preparation affect affect things later down the line. For example, if a player has a vertical racket shaft, how does that effect the possibilities? Do they get any increased torque...more power? Or are there timing issues involved with having a vertical shaft that club players would find hard manage. Zverev is a really skinny guy but seems to get an awful lot of power with his method.

    Thoughts, anyone?

    Leave a comment:


  • scottmurphy
    replied
    Tremendously important observations here. Two of the most prevalent mistakes I see players make are the lack of a unit or body turn compounded by poor timing of the turn. When these inadequacies occur the inevitability of a rushed, late, incomplete swing is a given. Pros HAVE to prepare well based on the pace they face but a recreational player shouldn't assume they have the time to snooze with regard to preparation because the time between the bounce and the best point of contact is sneaky fast.

    Scott Murphy USPTA
    Marin County

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  • klacr
    replied
    Surprised this video has not received a reaction yet. Great quality and explanations of the where, what and why. The two handed backhand is a stroke that is prevalent on not just the tour level, but also at every tennis club and public courts around the world. All coaches on this forum have to know how to teach it and all players at what time or another often wondered how to hit it on a bio-mechanical level. As much as I love my one-handed backhand, I won't be so dogmatic in my approach to envy the awesomeness that is the Djokovic two-hander.

    Preparation is the key and just like I tell my students, what starts in chaos ends in chaos. Get the preparation correct and there is a excellent chance you are on your way to a solid stroke.

    Kyle LaCroix USPTA
    Boca Raton

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  • A New Teaching Method: Two Handed Backhand Preparation

    Would love your thoughts on my article, "A New Teaching Method: Two Handed Backhand Preparation"

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