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One Handed Backhand: Backswings

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  • johnyandell
    started a topic One Handed Backhand: Backswings

    One Handed Backhand: Backswings

    Would love to discuss my latest article, "One Handed Backhand: Backswings"

  • johnyandell
    replied
    Whatever love his backhand!

    Leave a comment:


  • stotty
    replied
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    Yeah they seemed to show that his grip if it has changed that change is almost or maybe completely imperceptible...
    It doesn't take much to make a big difference. I use continental on my forehand and if I shift it round a tiny bit it feels like and semi western to me yet everyone thinks my grip hasn't changed a bit!

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Yeah they seemed to show that his grip if it has changed that change is almost or maybe completely imperceptible...

    Leave a comment:


  • stotty
    replied
    Originally posted by stroke View Post

    He could have made an almost stealth grip change when he made the racquet change, it makes it more difficult to quantify as he pretty much drops his hand so low on the grip on that side that the butt of the grip is practically in his palm, but to me, his hitting arm structure is not the same as Stan, Gasquet. Kohl, Guga. Gaudio, Shaprolova, and all these players that have their heel pad more behind the grip.
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    Actually his grip looks different from different viewpoints. From the front, knuckles facing you, his grip looks very mild, but from the back or side where you get to see his heel pad, it looks stronger.

    Didn't Jim do some photos of Roger's grip close up? I have it in my mind he did. I will peruse the threads to see if I can find any.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Stotty look at this: pre 2008:

    https://www.tennisplayer.net/members...Side1.mp4&new=

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  • stroke
    replied
    Originally posted by stotty View Post

    Yes well I watched the 2008 Wimbledon final from just a few rows back and I can tell you that, back then, his grip was more moderate. I swear it. He hit quite flat much of the time and had a lot more trouble hitting over a high ball than he does now. I'd put money he has eked that grip further round over the years.

    Well that's my story and I am absolutely sticking to it. I was there!
    He could have made an almost stealth grip change when he made the racquet change, it makes it more difficult to quantify as he pretty much drops his hand so low on the grip on that side that the butt of the grip is practically in his palm, but to me, his hitting arm structure is not the same as Stan, Gasquet. Kohl, Guga. Gaudio, Shaprolova, and all these players that have their heel pad more behind the grip.

    Leave a comment:


  • stotty
    replied
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    Stroke you nailed it. Only point is Fed's grip is one bevel stronger than Henman but not like the other guys...
    Yes well I watched the 2008 Wimbledon final from just a few rows back and I can tell you that, back then, his grip was more moderate. I swear it. He hit quite flat much of the time and had a lot more trouble hitting over a high ball than he does now. I'd put money he has eked that grip further round over the years.

    Well that's my story and I am absolutely sticking to it. I was there!

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Stroke you nailed it. Only point is Fed's grip is one bevel stronger than Henman but not like the other guys...

    Leave a comment:


  • stroke
    replied
    Henman has a simple beautiful backhand, a lot like Fed's grip structure. I think his mild grip is the key to this short backswing motion where it is more conducive to taking the ball early. I would call it a mild eastern backhand grip, with his heel pad at mostly on top on the top of the grip, bevel 1. These guys like Shaprolova, Stan, Gasquet, Guga, Kohl, all have higher backswings and their heel pad is past bevel 1, more behind the grip.
    Last edited by stroke; 01-24-2020, 05:20 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    Stotty,
    You are stealing my conclusion about Henman. I agree.

    Leave a comment:


  • stotty
    replied
    Nice walk thru on the different backswings. It's always a treat to watch these videos and accumulate bits and bob of knowledge one didn't know beforehand.

    I am a one-hander and I try to copy different styles to see what they feel like. I find these high backswings like Shapovalov's difficult to do under duress yet Denis has no such problem. I wonder if these types of backswings make taking the ball early more problematic and whether there is a relationship between standing further behind the baseline with such players.

    I like the Henman model for my students. It simple and was as good as most in its day.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    The opposition of the arm and the kick back of the left foot combined with the swing to extension solves all.

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  • doctorhl
    replied
    Originally posted by don_budge View Post

    johnyandell...another excellent fundamental explanation of a tennis stroke. I would like to say once again that the excellence of your website is consistent and excellent. I have been with you a full decade now and only on two occasions have I had any differences with you. Make that three if you count "Trump for President". The first is the swinging volley. I forget what the second was.

    Your website has been pure recreational fun for me all of these years...here we are in 2020. Never once have I sensed a letup in your passion to deliver a product that is truly the best bang for the buck in tennis. I am sure that nearly all in the forum will attest to this. Thank you.



    One fundamental that is present in everyone of these beautiful collage of backswings is the shoulder turn. It was Don Budge himself who privately told me that it was the turning of the shoulder to show the opponent the side of your back that was the key to power. Everyone of these swings exhibit at least a 45 degree turn of the shoulders. Mr. Budge also made a point of telling me to point the shoulder at the incoming ball. Carrying forwards from the backswing position you can see that the players are basically rotating 90 degrees through the shot. Excellent point about the use of the arm. The arm getting ahead of the shoulders. Basically in any sport hitting balls with a bat, club or racquet you can go with the axiom...never let the arms get ahead of the shoulders.
    In agreement on the arms not getting ahead of the shoulders. But, shoulders must eventually block and let arms catch up and then move ahead. As JY indicates, some players overrotate hips and shoulders so hard that they hit across the ball( outside in) because arms are left behind. Itís hard to get hips, shoulders, arm, then block right side...... followed by arms,shoulders, and hips. Sound like left handed baseball or golf driver swing if ball teed up about 3 feet high?

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    DB,
    Thanks for the great words. I try...
    Yeah...you work hard. You deliver. The age old recipe for success. Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:

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