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One Handed Backhand: Backswings

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  • johnyandell
    started a topic One Handed Backhand: Backswings

    One Handed Backhand: Backswings

    Would love to discuss my latest article, "One Handed Backhand: Backswings"

  • doctorhl
    replied
    Originally posted by don_budge View Post

    johnyandell...another excellent fundamental explanation of a tennis stroke. I would like to say once again that the excellence of your website is consistent and excellent. I have been with you a full decade now and only on two occasions have I had any differences with you. Make that three if you count "Trump for President". The first is the swinging volley. I forget what the second was.

    Your website has been pure recreational fun for me all of these years...here we are in 2020. Never once have I sensed a letup in your passion to deliver a product that is truly the best bang for the buck in tennis. I am sure that nearly all in the forum will attest to this. Thank you.



    One fundamental that is present in everyone of these beautiful collage of backswings is the shoulder turn. It was Don Budge himself who privately told me that it was the turning of the shoulder to show the opponent the side of your back that was the key to power. Everyone of these swings exhibit at least a 45 degree turn of the shoulders. Mr. Budge also made a point of telling me to point the shoulder at the incoming ball. Carrying forwards from the backswing position you can see that the players are basically rotating 90 degrees through the shot. Excellent point about the use of the arm. The arm getting ahead of the shoulders. Basically in any sport hitting balls with a bat, club or racquet you can go with the axiom...never let the arms get ahead of the shoulders.
    In agreement on the arms not getting ahead of the shoulders. But, shoulders must eventually block and let arms catch up and then move ahead. As JY indicates, some players overrotate hips and shoulders so hard that they hit across the ball( outside in) because arms are left behind. Itís hard to get hips, shoulders, arm, then block right side...... followed by arms,shoulders, and hips. Sound like left handed baseball or golf driver swing if ball teed up about 3 feet high?

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    DB,
    Thanks for the great words. I try...
    Yeah...you work hard. You deliver. The age old recipe for success. Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    DB,
    Thanks for the great words. I try...

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by don_budge View Post
    One fundamental that is present in everyone of these beautiful collage of backswings is the shoulder turn. It was Don Budge himself who privately told me that it was the turning of the shoulder to show the opponent the side of your back that was the key to power. Everyone of these swings exhibit at least a 45 degree turn of the shoulders. Mr. Budge also made a point of telling me to point the shoulder at the incoming ball. Carrying forwards from the backswing position you can see that the players are basically rotating 90 degrees through the shot. Excellent point about the use of the arm. The arm getting ahead of the shoulders. Basically in any sport hitting balls with a bat, club or racquet you can go with the axiom...never let the arms get ahead of the shoulders.
    Pointing the shoulder "down" at the ball whenever possible I might add...according to Don Budge. This also helps to elevate the backswing back and up into position. Also if the shoulder is rotating from a position pointing downwards it must go up and if the arms are following the trajectory of the shoulders this is going to dictate a upwards swing across the back of the ball not to mention the drive through the ball. The issue of greatest speed is the forward swing but you must discuss how to get there. How to get in position. The "track" of the forward swing is downhill and if you allow gravity to perform her little miracle in combination with the biomechanics of he body the greatest speed will of course be at the bottom of the track. An extremely important point and only executable if the arms do not get ahead of the shoulders. Norman Ashbrooke's point of the average duff in tennis using their arms is going to prevent them from getting the necessary acceleration...the necessary launch into the stroke. Looking forwards to the next instalment.

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    I will have more to say on that in future articles. There is some torso rotation especially on the more extreme grips. It's a balance and overotating is a common problem I see at lower levels.
    johnyandell...another excellent fundamental explanation of a tennis stroke. I would like to say once again that the excellence of your website is consistent and excellent. I have been with you a full decade now and only on two occasions have I had any differences with you. Make that three if you count "Trump for President". The first is the swinging volley. I forget what the second was.

    Your website has been pure recreational fun for me all of these years...here we are in 2020. Never once have I sensed a letup in your passion to deliver a product that is truly the best bang for the buck in tennis. I am sure that nearly all in the forum will attest to this. Thank you.

    Originally posted by ten1050 View Post
    Hello John,
    This was a very interesting video on the backswing of a one handed backhand. You mentioned that racket acceleration does not begin until the bottom of the backswing. What role does torso rotation play in the racket and arm acceleration? Is it safe to say that torso and hip rotation propel the relaxed arm into the forward swing? It always seems that adult club players use their arms to power their backhands, whereas youngsters tend to rotate their torsos to generate their racket head speed.

    Norman Ashbrooke
    One fundamental that is present in everyone of these beautiful collage of backswings is the shoulder turn. It was Don Budge himself who privately told me that it was the turning of the shoulder to show the opponent the side of your back that was the key to power. Everyone of these swings exhibit at least a 45 degree turn of the shoulders. Mr. Budge also made a point of telling me to point the shoulder at the incoming ball. Carrying forwards from the backswing position you can see that the players are basically rotating 90 degrees through the shot. Excellent point about the use of the arm. The arm getting ahead of the shoulders. Basically in any sport hitting balls with a bat, club or racquet you can go with the axiom...never let the arms get ahead of the shoulders.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    I will have more to say on that in future articles. There is some torso rotation especially on the more extreme grips. It's a balance and overotating is a common problem I see at lower levels.

    Leave a comment:


  • ten1050
    replied
    Hello John,
    This was a very interesting video on the backswing of a one handed backhand. You mentioned that racket acceleration does not begin until the bottom of the backswing. What role does torso rotation play in the racket and arm acceleration? Is it safe to say that torso and hip rotation propel the relaxed arm into the forward swing? It always seems that adult club players use their arms to power their backhands, whereas youngsters tend to rotate their torsos to generate their racket head speed.

    Norman Ashbrooke

    Leave a comment:

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