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Determining your Game Style

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  • jeffreycounts
    started a topic Determining your Game Style

    Determining your Game Style

    Let's discuss Nick Wheatley's article, "Marginal Gains: Determining your Game Style"

  • stotty
    replied
    Originally posted by klacr View Post

    Great points stotty. Different countries, different cultures... but we still are on the same wavelength. I do exactly the same with all of my students. I always ask their what their game style is and their best shot. Often times their answer is either the complete opposite of what they do or their perceived strength is a glaring weakness. That is, if they can even answer the question. Most ponder and shrug their shoulders. The first step to becoming a good/great player is to understand who you actually are as a player. A SWOT analysis of your game
    Strengths
    Weaknesses
    Opportunities
    Threats

    This simple act can really do wonders and get the player to take a proactive role in their learning and development

    Kyle LaCroix USPTA
    Delray Beach
    SETS Consulting
    SWOT is a good one. I like it. One of the reasons I like Nick's article is that it gives coaches/players a framework to start building a game style. I have a player at the moment who is a like donkey around the court; a defender he could never be, but he is built like a barn door so has the option of the aggressive game style. I had to level with him because for some reason he viewed himself as being a good mover when he is anything but. So I had to 'sell' and make him 'buy into' the aggressive game stye, which he now has. Sometimes you have to be honest with the athlete so you can then encourage the athlete to be honest with himself.

    Many years ago, David Emery, the British 400m hurdler, researched and compiled the most important aspects in the making of a champion, which were found to be: family (all athletes need cast iron support from family) and honesty (as in the athlete being honest with himself). The athlete must also come from a 'well organised' family in terms of they manage commitment and time.
    Last edited by stotty; 02-12-2020, 06:50 AM.

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  • klacr
    replied
    Originally posted by stotty View Post
    Nice article, Nick...…doing our country proud yet again.

    When I take on a new player, one of the first things I will ask them to do is describe their game style to me. Very often they struggle to give a definitive answer because they’ve never given any thought to what their game style actually is. It’s a good exercise getting players to think about their strengths and weaknesses and how these might fit in with their actual game style. Often I find a player’s perceived game style is different from their actual game style, especially in the case of juniors.

    nytennisaddict has a good point about personality playing a part. It's a big factor, for sure.

    Bigger backswings seem to be out these days, unless you're a woman that is...then the backswing goes on forever. But look how limiting that can be for a forehand. Sure you can get some hefty forehands in the women's game but often at the cost of spin and consistency.
    Great points stotty. Different countries, different cultures... but we still are on the same wavelength. I do exactly the same with all of my students. I always ask their what their game style is and their best shot. Often times their answer is either the complete opposite of what they do or their perceived strength is a glaring weakness. That is, if they can even answer the question. Most ponder and shrug their shoulders. The first step to becoming a good/great player is to understand who you actually are as a player. A SWOT analysis of your game
    Strengths
    Weaknesses
    Opportunities
    Threats

    This simple act can really do wonders and get the player to take a proactive role in their learning and development

    Kyle LaCroix USPTA
    Delray Beach
    SETS Consulting

    Leave a comment:


  • stotty
    replied
    Nice article, Nick...…doing our country proud yet again.

    When I take on a new player, one of the first things I will ask them to do is describe their game style to me. Very often they struggle to give a definitive answer because they’ve never given any thought to what their game style actually is. It’s a good exercise getting players to think about their strengths and weaknesses and how these might fit in with their actual game style. Often I find a player’s perceived game style is different from their actual game style, especially in the case of juniors.

    nytennisaddict has a good point about personality playing a part. It's a big factor, for sure.

    Bigger backswings seem to be out these days, unless you're a woman that is...then the backswing goes on forever. But look how limiting that can be for a forehand. Sure you can get some hefty forehands in the women's game but often at the cost of spin and consistency.
    Last edited by stotty; 02-10-2020, 01:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickw
    replied
    Plenty to discuss here for sure, we had a good discussion about personality type in the thread from last month's article.

    I think pace of shot is covered under the attacking and consistent options, with higher pace shots being linked to the attacking game-style, and lower pace to consistent and counter-puncher. Spin is obviously directly linked to pace, as the more spin is put on a ball, the more that ball is being slowed down through the air. More spin = less pace, and vice versa.

    I certainly agree that length of swing does dictate the most suitable style of play to some extent. Players who thrive on taking the ball early, must have shorter compact backswings, whilst players who look to generate heavy topspin, must have bigger backswings. However, the genius of Nadal is in one way demonstrated by his ability to shorten his backswings to achieve success on grass. It was this move along with standing nearer the baseline that allowed him to break through for his first Wimbledon title imo. It seems many other players haven't devloped the versatility to adapt their games in this way.

    Another thing to consider is the early hitting type of player, who looks to take the ball very early, and to use the pace of his opponent to send the ball back fast and fairly flat. This is an example of high pace being acheived with a more compact backswing. I like the idea of small at the back, and big in front, when it comes to developing efficient technique on groundstrokes. Short compact preparation followed by explosive weight transfer from good use of the kinetic chain. Do that with early contact, and you'll be hitting the ball like a dream!

    Leave a comment:


  • nytennisaddict
    replied
    good article...

    only thing missing is personality type... which might automatically be accounted for by the style you choose...
    eg. if you're risk averse, but playing an attacking style... or vice-versa (risk taker, but forced to play a defensive game),
    it will influence how you practice, how tension builds for your, during a point, etc...

    for example, while i've played the counter puncher role, especially against big hitters, i typically want to hit out (eg. big inside-out or inside-in fh) whenever i get a chance. ironically, while i like playing aggressive, i don't get the same satisfaction hitting a volley winner at the net (no matter how delicate).

    if he's gonna list spins in your arsenal... should he also list pace?
    eg. are you a big hitter (arguably with a big windup), or a controlled hitter (eg. shorter backswing, borrow incoming pace, etc...)
    if your stroke is more abbreivated like agassi, you might have to play close to baseline... whereas it's unlikely that agassi would have been as successful if he played as far back as nadal/thiem (similarly nadal/thiem can't play as close to the baseline due to their much larger swings)

    in the end, for each set of tools (spin & pace variety), there will be specific combinations/patters that will fit your playstyle.

    Leave a comment:

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