Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Developing Touch: Drop Shots

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • J011yroger
    replied
    Originally posted by flatflat View Post
    OK. I personally don't like most drop shots I see because they telegraph . . . either with a racquet head "scooping" in a semicircle motion or with the "feathering" motion on a down-the-line forehand. Learned this from a "how to" tennis book in the 1980's. A passage by Pancho Segura said to "let the ball knock the racquet out of your hand". I only do it on a short ball, hitting a half-volley but almost releasing my grip at the last moment. The ball will barely make it over the net. Works on drop volleys too - in fact you can convert the pace of a hard-hit passing shot into backspin,making it even more effective.

    I have tried to pass this technique on to a few teaching pro's because I have never been able to convince a player to try it. Sounds too dumb or something, and it only shows up to someone watching as a complete absence of technique (unless you actually drop your racquet).

    PS If you are using one of the modern 95 sq. in. or wider racquets, you have to let the ball contact the strings off-center (above the center line of the string bed) or the modern racquet will send the ball too deep into the court and your opponent will pass you.
    You need to play with more South American clay courters.

    Dastardly.

    J

    Leave a comment:


  • doctorhl
    replied
    flat flat: Totally agree on the “softhands” half volley and drop volley, especially if the opponent strikes the ball hard. Didn’t think about the 95 sq inch thing... I think you are right because I lost some touch when I went to 100. Have used the same concept for net play in badminton and Pickleball tournaments.

    Leave a comment:


  • flatflat
    replied
    OK. I personally don't like most drop shots I see because they telegraph . . . either with a racquet head "scooping" in a semicircle motion or with the "feathering" motion on a down-the-line forehand. Learned this from a "how to" tennis book in the 1980's. A passage by Pancho Segura said to "let the ball knock the racquet out of your hand". I only do it on a short ball, hitting a half-volley but almost releasing my grip at the last moment. The ball will barely make it over the net. Works on drop volleys too - in fact you can convert the pace of a hard-hit passing shot into backspin,making it even more effective.

    I have tried to pass this technique on to a few teaching pro's because I have never been able to convince a player to try it. Sounds too dumb or something, and it only shows up to someone watching as a complete absence of technique (unless you actually drop your racquet).

    PS If you are using one of the modern 95 sq. in. or wider racquets, you have to let the ball contact the strings off-center (above the center line of the string bed) or the modern racquet will send the ball too deep into the court and your opponent will pass you.

    Leave a comment:


  • doctorhl
    replied
    Originally posted by don_budge View Post

    That post that I wrote about the Federer Featherer is one of my favourites of my now 6,004 posts on this website. Though my posts tend to be lengthy...I haven't wasted a single word. When I referenced the Springsteen song "Brilliant Disguise" that was also a brilliant comparison as it is the disguise of the short ball and the element of surprise and deception that makes it effective. I love that post...I have to admit. Maybe in my top ten...at least top one hundred. 6,004...each one as clever as the next. Consistency! That's the key!

    Well nothing like a good old pat on the back on your birthday. Soon it will all be over. Roger Federer may have given us one last hurrah. He played a beautiful match against Daniel Evans and then sort of came out a bit flat in the next. Basilashvili. He couldn't handle the pace. A sign of maybe a couple of things...age and rust. It ends with Roger. Anyone with an ounce of discernment can see it. Most choose not to. Maybe they are just slaves...slaves to the game. Somehow addicted. To a placebo. Fake tennis. Life is fake now too. Fake life. Do as you are told. Take the jab.

    Back in 1976 or 1977 I was playing number one singles for Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. I played five players that played at Wimbledon that year. Lost to all in straight sets. But I fought with all of them. I had only been playing eight years or so. Not entire years either. I quit the tennis team to play ghetto ball with black guys one year. My coach gave me a choice. Ball or tennis. I chose ball. I don't regret it either. I went where no others dared to go. One of the players that I faced at Ohio University was a guy by the name of Francisco Gonzalez. A big menacing guy at Ohio State. Handsome guy with a big moustache. I didn't give a damn...I would play anybody in their backyard. Just like ghetto ball. But this guy showed me a drop shot I had never seen before and he wanted to humiliate me every chance he could. He wanted to make me wish my Mom never had me. All is fair.

    Off of his backhand he would make such a tremendous cut on the ball with a somewhat open face, he tried to bounce the ball on my side of the court and make it bounce back on the his side of the court. He was toying with me. I think that at that point in time that he had a win over Jimmy Connors. What a brute. Jack Kramer Autograph. A classic player from Latin America somewhere. So guess what? I learned that shot as well. That's how we rolled. Nobody taught me a drop shot per se. My coach taught me tactics. Bring the opponent in and then lob over his head. You tried it out in competition. You ironed out the kinks and then put it into play.

    I don't recall ever being taught to drop shot. I was a great lobber. Same principle...a combination of the angle of the racquet face and trajectory of the swing. You figured it out...or you were eaten.





    DB: I too got embarrassed by the swing cut drop shot in doubles. But, in this instance it was a Backhand swing cut drop VOLLEY that bounced back into the net. Since we were deep behind the baseline and on our heels on clay, he could afford to have a margin of error on height. If done on a hard court, the spin would not have grabbed the ground hard enough for a backward bounce. Plus we could have gotten off our heels on a hard court much quicker. Any body know of a link for footage of a swinging “ cut” drop volley. The swing part was short, but had acceleration through contact and was hit with a fairly open racket face made easier by a last minute shift to a forehand grip I think. I know McEnroe and Nasty developed this shot because they actually experienced singles net play on clay. Please support: Bring Back Net Play Now Political Action Group.

    Leave a comment:


  • stroke
    replied
    As I said earlier, Fed is the master of the slice backhand, and his dropper looks exactly the same preparation. Tomic's on the forehand is the best disguise I have ever seen. It looks exactly like his forehand drive until the last moment. He has such a short backswing anyway, and a mild semi western grip, which I don't think he changes at all for that weird(and cool looking) drop shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • jthb1021
    replied
    At the higher levels of tennis there has to be disguise right? Learning this shot by preparing in the continental grip stepping in and playing it a little like the shape of a “J” is great. But the masters of the forehand drop shot prepare like they’re going to hit their topspin forehand and then drop it out of that preparation. It’s actually not that difficult! What Tomic did to achieve a sort of illegitimate cousin to the drop shot is interesting but I don’t view that as one to look up to. Cool shot though!
    I use a semi western forehand grip for my topspin forehand and in preparation for my forehand dropper. I may slide the grip over to a strong eastern grip to but if I do it Is barely. Holding the disguise long enough is the part that was hardest for me then the racquet face for a strong eastern or semi western grip is already open for a perfectly disguised shot. If you sell it long enough they won’t anticipate it and get a slow first step which is all you need if you execute properly.
    On a low and short ball the forehand slice is a great play at the club level. Let’s chip and charge to the opponents bh is typically the choice for me, but every now and again I’ll play a classic dropper off of that with the technique shown in this presentation.
    Personally, I love my backhand dropper down the line. The disguise is easy because as a one hander I love to slice. The ball naturally has a runaway spin to it where it hits the court and bites toward the alley. I use my backhand drop shot probably 4:1 over the forehand side. I think the backhand drop shot is easier to disguise for most tennis players as well. For the two handers you gotta give Novak’s backhand drop shot some love on this series as well, it’s as well disguised as any shot in our sport.
    Drop shots are always a fun topic and I really like this first part of this series because this would be how you should learn the drop shot. I’m assuming the disguise is coming next month or in subsequent articles.

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by stroke View Post
    https://youtu.be/Ox68399L7rE

    Tomic drop shot, one of the best disguised forehand droppers I have ever seen.
    Strange shot stroke. Not exactly what I would call a drop shot. A soft forehand...with sidespin. Plenty of disguise as well. This is almost a deceleration of the racquet head. As if he is going to take a full swing and then pulls the brakes after he has initiated the swing. The announcer mentions he has seen him blow this shot as well. In my "Federer Featherer" I mention a loss of control and diminished statistical probability of pulling off a drop shot and this is a good illustration of such a thing. Leave it to Tomic. Not the sharpest tool in the shed by any stretch of the imagination. Long on talent...short on attention span. This is a perfect example. He probably lost this match but it made him happy and satisfied to pull of such a stunt shot. He and Kyrgios...peas in a pod.

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by doctorhl View Post
    Yes, DB, you are right on target about the subtle acceleration through the ball...
    That post that I wrote about the Federer Featherer is one of my favourites of my now 6,004 posts on this website. Though my posts tend to be lengthy...I haven't wasted a single word. When I referenced the Springsteen song "Brilliant Disguise" that was also a brilliant comparison as it is the disguise of the short ball and the element of surprise and deception that makes it effective. I love that post...I have to admit. Maybe in my top ten...at least top one hundred. 6,004...each one as clever as the next. Consistency! That's the key!

    Well nothing like a good old pat on the back on your birthday. Soon it will all be over. Roger Federer may have given us one last hurrah. He played a beautiful match against Daniel Evans and then sort of came out a bit flat in the next. Basilashvili. He couldn't handle the pace. A sign of maybe a couple of things...age and rust. It ends with Roger. Anyone with an ounce of discernment can see it. Most choose not to. Maybe they are just slaves...slaves to the game. Somehow addicted. To a placebo. Fake tennis. Life is fake now too. Fake life. Do as you are told. Take the jab.

    Back in 1976 or 1977 I was playing number one singles for Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. I played five players that played at Wimbledon that year. Lost to all in straight sets. But I fought with all of them. I had only been playing eight years or so. Not entire years either. I quit the tennis team to play ghetto ball with black guys one year. My coach gave me a choice. Ball or tennis. I chose ball. I don't regret it either. I went where no others dared to go. One of the players that I faced at Ohio University was a guy by the name of Francisco Gonzalez. A big menacing guy at Ohio State. Handsome guy with a big moustache. I didn't give a damn...I would play anybody in their backyard. Just like ghetto ball. But this guy showed me a drop shot I had never seen before and he wanted to humiliate me every chance he could. He wanted to make me wish my Mom never had me. All is fair.

    Off of his backhand he would make such a tremendous cut on the ball with a somewhat open face, he tried to bounce the ball on my side of the court and make it bounce back on the his side of the court. He was toying with me. I think that at that point in time that he had a win over Jimmy Connors. What a brute. Jack Kramer Autograph. A classic player from Latin America somewhere. So guess what? I learned that shot as well. That's how we rolled. Nobody taught me a drop shot per se. My coach taught me tactics. Bring the opponent in and then lob over his head. You tried it out in competition. You ironed out the kinks and then put it into play.

    I don't recall ever being taught to drop shot. I was a great lobber. Same principle...a combination of the angle of the racquet face and trajectory of the swing. You figured it out...or you were eaten.




    Leave a comment:


  • doctorhl
    replied
    Originally posted by stroke View Post
    https://youtu.be/Ox68399L7rE

    Tomic drop shot, one of the best disguised forehand droppers I have ever seen.
    What the heck? Looks like he swung horizontally to his left at ball contact with an open face. Unbelievable disguise.

    Leave a comment:


  • stotty
    replied
    Originally posted by doctorhl View Post
    Yes, DB, you are right on target about the subtle acceleration through the ball, a pre-requisite to hitting the spin or “ weighted” drop shot as Stotty so astutely refers to it. The “carved “ drop shot tends to not have any acceleration through the shot and tends to fail short of the net more than the spin dropshot. But, I have a problem accelerating through a club level speed/spin ball. Roger also seems to use a little forward body movement at times to help with acceleration of racket. McEnroe sure seemed to be able to use a little more forward body movement and less arm movement to accelerate the racket through contact on spin drop shots. He also exaggerated this move with half volley drop shots. Anyone have footage of a half volley dropshot? Usually done on grass when people used to come to the net. The shot had little spin, but allowed McEnroe to close in like hell and the opponent had to dig up the dead ball. Seems like this shot was really effective with the old, heavy Slazenger balls when the grass had moisture in it. Or, am I just dreaming this up, Stotty?
    I think the drop shot is very effective on grass or clay, less so on hard courts. McEnroe's drop shots were exquisite and he played them so effectively on grass. More generally he was so good at doing just enough...nudging and placing balls into spaces to win points rather than bludgeoning. I always thought he played perfect grass court tennis, and by this I mean he played the right shot off virtually every single ball. He's the most unique player, certainly in my living memory.

    Leave a comment:


  • doctorhl
    replied
    Yes, DB, you are right on target about the subtle acceleration through the ball, a pre-requisite to hitting the spin or “ weighted” drop shot as Stotty so astutely refers to it. The “carved “ drop shot tends to not have any acceleration through the shot and tends to fail short of the net more than the spin dropshot. But, I have a problem accelerating through a club level speed/spin ball. Roger also seems to use a little forward body movement at times to help with acceleration of racket. McEnroe sure seemed to be able to use a little more forward body movement and less arm movement to accelerate the racket through contact on spin drop shots. He also exaggerated this move with half volley drop shots. Anyone have footage of a half volley dropshot? Usually done on grass when people used to come to the net. The shot had little spin, but allowed McEnroe to close in like hell and the opponent had to dig up the dead ball. Seems like this shot was really effective with the old, heavy Slazenger balls when the grass had moisture in it. Or, am I just dreaming this up, Stotty?

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    For David Hagler:

    Originally posted by don_budge View Post
    Anticipating Roger's Thunder...then faced with a Federfore Featherer.

    http://www.tennisplayer.net/bulletin...liant+disguise

    What's the name of that Springsteen tune...Brilliant Disguise?

    Brilliant Disguise....Bruce Springsteen

    I hold you in my arms
    As the band plays
    What are those words whispered baby
    Just as you turn away
    I saw you last night
    Out on the edge of town
    I wanna read your mind
    To know just what I've got in
    This new thing I've found
    So tell me what I see
    When I look in your eyes
    Is that you baby
    Or just a brilliant disguise

    Now you play the loving woman
    I'll play the faithful man
    But just don't look too close
    Into the palm of my hand
    We stood at the altar
    The gypsy swore our future was right
    But come the wee wee hours
    Well maybe baby the gypsy lied
    So when you look at me
    You better look hard and look twice
    Is that me baby
    Or just a brilliant disguise

    Tonight our bed is cold
    I'm lost in the darkness of our love
    God have mercy on the man
    Who doubts what he's sure of

    Well talk about lovely tennis shots. This little feathery is a stroke of genius and it's brilliance is in it's disguise. The initial manipulation of the racquet head with the shoulder turn allows The Swiss Maestro to perform two radically different motions, he can pound it into the corners or he can soothe it and smooth it trickling over the net...how beautiful is that? It hurts when you realize what is coming...you've been fooled!

    With his racquet head in proper position...where the racquet head is higher than his hand and just as importantly the head of the racquet is just barely behind his hand so that he has maintained the subtle flex in his wrist, he is in position to make this soft caress on the ball with his strings moving subtly down and across the back of the ball. It's basically a forehand volley stroke. Notice he is not accomplishing this motion with just his hand...or just his arm...or just anything for that matter. His entire being is into this shot...every bit as much as it is behind his Federfore forehand blast or his biggest serves. The whole being of Roger Federer is into his softest shot...with just the right proportion of forward movement necessary to accomplish such a soft placement. Voila...the Federfore Featherer.

    The subtle forward movement as he is making contact with the ball is the key. Many try to slide the racquet under the ball with the wrist or try to absorb the ball into the racquet with an almost backwards movement which are both very risky tries on this type of shot...in fact they don't make any sense statistically speaking. Look at his eyes and the position of his head. No head fakes. No no-lookies. The racquet head must be accelerating through the ball on contact or else you can kiss all semblance of control goodbye. Knowing Roger Federer...knowing what a control freak he is, this is going to be the last thing he is going to surrender on such a tender shot...control.

    The most difficult aspect of making short putts in golf is the realization that you must accelerate the putter face through the ball. You have got to swing the putter. For you golfer/tennis players out there try visualizing swinging through to the point of the ball that is closest to the hole or rather closest to the net. Trying to push the ball into the hole or trying to wish it into the hole creates a large degree of uncertainty or doubt even on short putts or shots. That is the last thing you want to be feeling on such a delicate shot or stroke...it's the kiss of death. The same thing applies here...you have to swing the racquet. Even the shortest of shots share some of the most fundamental characteristics as the bigger shots...turn the body away from the ball and move the body through the ball. Weight forward on the front foot and accelerate the racquet head through the ball...it's virtually the same recipe for making short putts.

    This tennis player is an artist and you could say that he is "poetry in motion".
    Would it be possible to see this shot from the other side of his body so that we can fully appreciate the disguise of his backswing? It's one thing to hit brilliantly disguised backhand drop shots and quite another to deliver the feathery touch off the forehand side...as in the Federfore Featherer.

    God have mercy on the man...who doubts what he's sure of.


    Leave a comment:


  • stroke
    replied
    Oddsmakers have Rublev, Thiem, and Fed as equal cofavorites to win this tournament.

    Leave a comment:


  • stroke
    replied
    Originally posted by stotty View Post
    What I don't understand is why Roger has a bye. Why isn't another lower ranked player allowed in the draw to make a 1st round opponent for Roger. We have had to wait a year for Roger's return and now we are waiting until Wednesday to get a glimpse. It's like waiting for the return of Jesus Christ.
    I agree. I thought these tournaments had done away with 1st round byes but apparently not. And so true, only 32 man draw and they have byes in the draw. OH brother, and please wear a mask, I am begging you.

    Leave a comment:


  • stroke
    replied
    https://youtu.be/Ox68399L7rE

    Tomic drop shot, one of the best disguised forehand droppers I have ever seen.

    Leave a comment:

Who's Online

Collapse

There are currently 126 users online. 6 members and 120 guests.

Most users ever online was 1,830 at 04:47 PM on 12-17-2019.

Working...
X