Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Life of Tony Trabert: Part 4

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • johnyandell
    replied
    Thanks DB.

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by johnyandell View Post
    The history of the game... on Tennisplayer...
    From a true student of the game...johnyandell. Another superb issue. The website has a consistent high level of quality every month. The hallmark of greatness...and value for the consumer. This particular story is a beauty and wonderfully told. From an insider. Tony Trabert was a classic. Some of us knew him in the broadcast booth. I was only peripherally aware of his playing days. I am a more knowledgable tennis student thanks to markwinters! Thanks to both of you.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    replied
    The history of the game... on Tennisplayer...

    Leave a comment:


  • markwinters
    replied
    Don:

    Delightful recollections...I enjoyed reading about the time your spent with J. Donald. Your mention of his grip-less racquet brought back a wonderful memory. The first summer I went to play in Europe (and that probably is an exaggeration when it came to my ability) I took grip-less 4 4/3 racquets. (Honestly, people at the clubs were more interested in my racquets than in my court skills). I always had trouble with my grip slipping. Around that the time, Bob Lutz was turning his grips over then scraping them with a wire paint removing brush. The resulting surface stayed rough and was easier to hold onto in a sweat-stained matches. So, I tried reversing my grips for a while. In the long run, it didn’t work for me. One day while I was practicing and my reverse grip became slippery. I decided to take it off and began to hit grip-less...and voila I could hold on to my bat. (As I am sure you know, in those day, real players used the cr?me de la cr?me of grips – Fairways).

    I appreciate both the time you have taken to read my Tony story and the thoughts you have offered,

    Mark

    PS. Feel free to email me at okram@earthlink.net so we can discuss today’s game.

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by markwinters View Post
    Don:

    Your mention of a Tony Trabert racquet brought back memories. My wife’s first racquet was a Tony Trabert. As my friendship with Tony developed, I began hitting with him more often. In time, he gave me one of his “bats”. It had a five inch grip and weighed a ton (well over fourteen ounces). I loved it... It didn’t make me a better player...but it didn’t make me any worse...and I could bludgeon my groundies.

    So glad you are enjoying the series,

    Mark
    Thanks markwinters...actually your series about Tony Trabert brings me great joy in furthering my knowledge about an era in tennis that is gone and forgotten by most and never known by the rest. Back then, my coach Sherm Collins taught me not only how to play tennis but to be a student of the game. He was an advocate of Bill Tilden and he used all the great players as examples regarding how they played and in his basic teaching of how to hit the ball. Mr. Collins was like a second father to me in a sense. His voice still resonates in my ear when I think about tennis and I actually call him on the phone just to hear his voice. His voice is still as strong and full of conviction at ninety something years old and he knows full well about what guys like Tony Trabert and company meant to the game. Ironically...I got my first racquet in 1969. That was a big year for tennis.

    My journey in the game of tennis included a two summer stint at the Don Budge Tennis Camp in McDonough, Maryland. That was in 1972 and 1973. I was so fortunate that my father sent me there and then was invited back to be a councillor and teacher for the rest of the first summer and the second. Most could not possibly understand what an influence a man like Mr. Budge could have on a young, rebellious spirit back in those days when life included a narrow escape from being drafted into the Vietnam War. Instead my days were idyllic and spent training under the watchful eye of the teachers and Mr. Budge himself. He was there every single day and even took all of his meals with the campers and staff. He was such a humble soul. He was truly a great man. When he spoke...I listened. I credit him with putting the finishing touches on my perfect service motion. Not to mention what he instilled in my heart as a passionate love for the game. God bless him.

    One day at the camp I was emboldened and took him by surprise. "Mr. Budge...would you hit a few with me?" "Sure Steve...go get my racquet out of the ball room." Before the words were out of his mouth I was shot out of a cannon retrieving his blunderbuss. Exactly as you described Tony's except his racquet did not have a leather grip. It was just the wood of the bat with longitudinal grooves to keep his hand from sliding off of it. Later on I got to play doubles with Mr. Budge and a girl named Connie who was California. She was an excellent partner and my partner Andy and I never touched the two of them. As good as my serve was even then...it came back with interest. Especially on the backhand. My left handed slice was wicked...but somehow the 58 year old champion of yesterday played it routinely and in a word...perfectly.

    Thanks for sharing your memories of these great champions of the past. Let me ask you this...what do you think of the modern game? I am definitely not a fan and put in the category of "fake tennis".

    Leave a comment:


  • markwinters
    replied
    Don:

    Your mention of a Tony Trabert racquet brought back memories. My wife’s first racquet was a Tony Trabert. As my friendship with Tony developed, I began hitting with him more often. In time, he gave me one of his “bats”. It had a five inch grip and weighed a ton (well over fourteen ounces). I loved it... It didn’t make me a better player...but it didn’t make me any worse...and I could bludgeon my groundies.

    So glad you are enjoying the series,

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • markwinters
    replied
    Bababa:

    I am delighted you are enjoying the Tony Trabert journey. As I am sure you know he was one of a kind!

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • don_budge
    replied
    Originally posted by bababa View Post
    Well I might be the only one following this series closely but I love it.
    You are not alone...I have thoroughly enjoyed every part of this series. One of my first racquets was a Tony Trabert wooden autograph. It was merely a Jack Kramer with a different paint job. Bought it in the basement from the cross town rival tennis coach who had a shop in his basement. He strung all the racquets in town too. Ralph Cornell...sort of like the character Robert Duval played in "Apocalypse Now".

    But the series...it's great. This chapter delved into parts unknown about Mr. Trabert. HIs Paris experience. Morphing into his professional career. Of course Richard Gonzalez had his way with Tony. But surprisingly Tony is at the top of the class...near the top. He is competitive with all of the Aussies. Fascinating series in dredging the past. Students of the game...pay attention! Thanks to the author and johnyandell of course for this. Wonderful!

    Leave a comment:


  • bababa
    replied
    Well I might be the only one following this series closely but I love it.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnyandell
    started a topic The Life of Tony Trabert: Part 4

    The Life of Tony Trabert: Part 4

    Let's discuss Mark Winters' article, "The Life of Tony Trabert: Part 4"

Who's Online

Collapse

There are currently 109 users online. 4 members and 105 guests.

Most users ever online was 1,830 at 05:47 PM on 12-17-2019.

Working...
X