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Two Handed Forehand !!!

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  • Two Handed Forehand !!!

    15 years ago I injured the wrist of my right hand and was forced to play two handed forehand. For years I put left hand over right hand but 4 years ago I switched to two handed forehand with crossed hands(Seles, Bartoli, Hradecka, Peng Shuai). After this change I was two times runner-up in Polish Championships in my age category(this year I had even matchball in the final). My exampe proves that two handed forehand is technique that can be used on the highest level(at least in senior`s tennis). Many times I beat players who were #50- #70 in ITF ranking. If you are interested in two handed forehand I can help.

  • #2
    Pancho Segura had a great two handed forehand. Kramer praised it.
    Regards, Phil

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    • #3
      Pancho Segura used two handed backhands on both sides. He changed the grip. I play two handed backhand and when I have tha ball on forehand side I dont change the grip. Precisely speaking my left hand stays where it was I only adjust right hand to western grip.

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      • #4
        I like your court position and how you catch the ball on the rise, taking time away from your opponent.

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        • #5
          I am not too strong so I have to use the strength of my opponents. I try to adjust my position to each ball. That is why I almost dont make any unforced errors. It is frustrating to my opponents. I try to play angles whenever it is possible. Two handed technique works excellent inside the court. This video was recorded in 2018. Since then I changed two handed forehand. Just today I found the last error. It turned out that in two handed forehand with crossed hands the left hand is dominant. It is more pulling than pushing. Strange but true. If you open my video in You Tube and click on "Tennis Sport" you can see my last videos.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Gregory Diamond View Post
            15 years ago I injured the wrist of my right hand and was forced to play two handed forehand. For years I put left hand over right hand but 4 years ago I switched to two handed forehand with crossed hands(Seles, Bartoli, Hradecka, Peng Shuai). After this change I was two times runner-up in Polish Championships in my age category(this year I had even matchball in the final). My exampe proves that two handed forehand is technique that can be used on the highest level(at least in senior`s tennis). Many times I beat players who were #50- #70 in ITF ranking. If you are interested in two handed forehand I can help.
            Funny, I used to have my daughter do a modified two hander where she placed her off (left) hand on her wrist. This really shortened up her backswing because it was basically impossible to move the racket back behind her and made her use the whole body. At times I have her do it today just to engage the whole body.

            Your two hander is very solid and I think even if a player has a one handed forehand it can still benefit from training with two hands.

            There is no way to cheat. You have to move your feet, get in position and use the entire body.

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            • #7
              I like this one. I just love the way he engages the shoulders and drives through ball. He made the shot beautiful and is the only player to date to do so.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMkIt2_xucs
              Stotty

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              • #8
                Pancho Segura used two handed forehand similar to that of Gambill and Hsieh Su -wei. They change hands. It is played almost like two handed backhand of left hander. The only difference is that not all fingers of left hand are on the handle. In some situations there is not enough time to switch hands and they use slice then. Two handed forehand with crossed hands has advantage because during transition from backhand to forehand only right hand should be slightly adjusted to western grip. You can see in my video that I practically dont use slice because I am almost always ready to use two handed backhand or forehand. Even when I am inside the court and dont have much time. You can see in the next video that it works even on much faster surfaces.
                 

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                • #9
                  Actually Segura had a two-handed forehand and a one-handed backhand

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                  • #10
                    You are right but Gambill and Hsieh Su-wei used the same type of two handed forehand as Segura. They switched hands when they tried to play backhand. I compared players who are two handed from both sides. In case of Segura It was even more difficult to play his two handed forehand after playing one handed backhand because his left hand was not on the handle after he finished his backhand.

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                    • #11
                      I coach a 15 year old girl who uses two hands on her forehand.

                      We tried and tried to clean up and reduce the size of her backswing on her one-handed forehand for a long time without success. So, one day while driving, the idea of having her change to a two-handed forehand jumped into my brain. Later that evening when I saw her for a lesson I told her she was going to have a two-handed forehand starting that day. She was actually very accepting of this idea. I was kind of surprised that she bought in so quickly.

                      I explained that it would be basically the same as her two-handed backhand which is really good. It worked like magic. The size of her backswing was immediately shortened. Her timing improved dramatically. She has more controllable power and she can now take balls on the rise.

                      The other thing that was awesome about the new forehand for her was that it was easier to use in "the real world" because whatever she would do with a particular ball with her backhand she would do exactly the same thing on her forehand. It made it much easier for her to manage and adapt to different incoming balls.

                      That lesson was on a Monday or Tuesday. She asked if she should use the new forehand in the upcoming tournament that coming weekend and I said "absolutely." She played a girl who had beaten her the weekend before this lesson. She beat that girl in the next tournament with an entirely new forehand!

                      She already had a very natural slice forehand (the "survival slice") and we've added a pretty good one-handed slice on her backhand. So, now she can attack or defend equally well off of both sides.

                      Her opponents don't know where to hit the ball because she can handle just about any ball and at least neutralize with her topspin or slice. She can rally high and heavy and then slice low and "slimy."

                      Most teenage girls don't like balls that jump or skid. These new additions to her game have helped tremendously.

                      My "mad scientist" idea has worked out very well

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                      • #12
                        Gregory Diamond...morespin. Excellent work morespin. Interesting video Gregory Diamond. In my stint as a tennis teacher and tennis philosopher I had the occasion to mull over the different aspects of the two handed forehand. See the thread below...it may be of some interest to you and worthy of a comment or two. Maybe not. Anyways...just food for thought. As usual.

                        Originally posted by morespin View Post
                        I coach a 15 year old girl who uses two hands on her forehand.

                        We tried and tried to clean up and reduce the size of her backswing on her one-handed forehand for a long time without success. So, one day while driving, the idea of having her change to a two-handed forehand jumped into my brain. Later that evening when I saw her for a lesson I told her she was going to have a two-handed forehand starting that day. She was actually very accepting of this idea. I was kind of surprised that she bought in so quickly.

                        I explained that it would be basically the same as her two-handed backhand which is really good. It worked like magic. The size of her backswing was immediately shortened. Her timing improved dramatically. She has more controllable power and she can now take balls on the rise.

                        The other thing that was awesome about the new forehand for her was that it was easier to use in "the real world" because whatever she would do with a particular ball with her backhand she would do exactly the same thing on her forehand. It made it much easier for her to manage and adapt to different incoming balls.

                        That lesson was on a Monday or Tuesday. She asked if she should use the new forehand in the upcoming tournament that coming weekend and I said "absolutely." She played a girl who had beaten her the weekend before this lesson. She beat that girl in the next tournament with an entirely new forehand!

                        She already had a very natural slice forehand (the "survival slice") and we've added a pretty good one-handed slice on her backhand. So, now she can attack or defend equally well off of both sides.

                        Her opponents don't know where to hit the ball because she can handle just about any ball and at least neutralize with her topspin or slice. She can rally high and heavy and then slice low and "slimy."

                        Most teenage girls don't like balls that jump or skid. These new additions to her game have helped tremendously.

                        My "mad scientist" idea has worked out very well
                        I, too may have been thought of as a mad scientist. But the thing is with me...there is ALWAYS method to my madness.

                        https://www.tennisplayer.net/bulleti...o-segura/page2

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We should distinguish two handed forehand with crossed hands(Seles, Hradecka, Peng, Bartoli, Gregory Diamond) and "two handed forehand" played similar to left handed two handed backhand(Segura, Hsieh, Gambill). In the first one left hand is dominant. In the second -right hand. Both techniques give great stability but the first one requires less time for changing grips. I tried both and I have no doubt that the first technique is much better. Seles and Bartoli won grand slams in singles and Hradecka and Peng in doubles. It was tested on highest level in women`s tennis. Hsieh also won grand slams in doubles(she played with Peng) but it is the only example of effectiveness of second technique. If we compare Peng and Hsieh we can see how often Hsieh is forced to play slice. Peng almost dosnt use it because she is always ready to play two handed forehand or backhand. We should also remember that two handed forehand has advantage over one handed inside the court so it wouldnt be wise to stay far behind the base line and use two handed forehand with crossed hands. I think that two handed forehand is better solution for most people. Simple argument proves that. Two handed players can play one handed too. They do it when the ball is far from the body. But when the ball is within the reach of two handed forehand they always choose two handed though they could use one handed too. One handed technique works for very strong players.

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                          • #14
                            Gene Mayer and Frew McMillan had two-handed forehands where their right hand sat on top of the grip and their left hand underneath. They then hit their backhands with same configuration; so a true two-handed forehand and a rather peculiar backhand. I prefer the true two-handed forehand because the right hand is truly dominant, and the players that used this configuration could hit the ball extraordinarily hard; Segura had phenomenal power relative to his era and at the equipment of that time. Great control and power. That's the benefit of the true two-handed forehand, right? The downside is lack of reach. Lack of reach is the number one reason not to use the true two-handed forehand. Releasing the other hand on the stretch is not the forte of true two-handed players. They dislike having to do it.
                            Last edited by stotty; 10-15-2019, 12:47 PM.
                            Stotty

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                            • #15
                              Segura, Mayer and McMillan used two handed backhand of the left handed player from forehand side.Their right dominant hand was not at the and of the handle so they lost most of the leverage. In two handed forehand with crossed hands dominant hand is at the end of the racket and it does most of the work but left hand gives additional power and rotation. If you want to see what power you can achieve using this technique try to watch Lucie Hradecka forehands.
                               

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