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Where Are We Now?
The Forehand Part 2

John Yandell

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Let's look at how to develop a great forward swing.

So in Part 1, we looked at the fundamentals of preparation including the body turn, the coiling in the stances, and the elements of a compact ATP backswing and the relationship between the positioning of the hand and the racket tip, depending on grip. Although there are many elements in pro forehands that don't apply at all levels, I said that the modern players actually provide the best possible models for the core fundamentals in preparation—even stronger than the so-called old school classical players.

We also addressed some bad ideas--though unfortunately widely disseminated--regarding the timing of preparation, the angle of the racket face, and the inferiority of fully open stances. (Click Here.)

Now let's look at the core elements in forward swing on a basic forehand power drive. And the conclusion is the same. As with preparation, if you know what to look for and what to develop, elite pros provide the best possible models as well in the forward swing for maximizing power, spin, and consistency in your forehand.

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John Yandell is widely acknowledged as one of the leading videographers and students of the modern game of professional tennis. His high speed filming for Advanced Tennis and Tennisplayer have provided new visual resources that have changed the way the game is studied and understood by both players and coaches. He has done personal video analysis for hundreds of high level competitive players, including Justine Henin-Hardenne, Taylor Dent and John McEnroe, among others.

In addition to his role as Editor of Tennisplayer he is the author of the critically acclaimed book Visual Tennis. The John Yandell Tennis School is located in San Francisco, California.